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Immune Globulins and Autism Ranking: Mildly Hazardous Strong negative evidence

Introduction

Syringe Immunoglobulins - including intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), gamma globulin or immune serum globulin - are substances derived from human blood plasma.

The plasma, processed from donated human blood, contains antibodies that protect the body against diseases.

Immunoglobulin injections or infusions are used in clinical medicine to treat patients with immune disorder conditions.

Some people think that some of the core symptoms of autism and some of the associated conditions, such as gastrointestinal problems, are caused by immunological deficiencies.

They also think that those deficiencies can be overcome by receiving immunoglobulins.

Our Opinion

There is no high quality research evidence to suggest that immunoglobulin therapy has any effect on the core symptoms of autism.

There is no high quality research evidence to suggest that immunoglobulin therapy has any effect on immunological problems in people on the autism spectrum.

There is a limited amount of high quality research evidence (a single randomised controlled trial) to suggest that immunoglobulin therapy has no effect on bowel disorders in individuals on the autism spectrum.

Immunoglobulin is expensive, inconvenient to use, and potentially harmful.

We therefore strongly recommend that Immunoglobulin therapy is not used as a treatment for people on the autism spectrum because of the substantial risks and the lack of proven benefit.

At the present time, it should only be undertaken under careful medical supervision as part of a well conducted research study.

Disclaimer

Please read our Disclaimer on Autism Interventions


Quick link:
http://researchautism.net/immune-globulins-and-autism
Updated
23 Mar 2017
Last Review
01 Jun 2014
Next Review
01 Mar 2017