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Research compares neural activity in children with and without autism spectrum disorder

Pick a hand, any hand. That familiar refrain, repeated in schoolyards the world over, is the basis of a simple guessing game that was recently adapted to study how and why kids with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) interact with the people around them.


The game is the brainchild of Katherine Stavropoulos, an assistant professor of special education in the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Riverside. As a licensed clinical psychologist with a background in neuroscience, Stavropoulos looks closely at electrical activity in the brains of children with ASD and typical development, or TD, to discern differences in the respective groups' reward systems.

Historically, clinicians and scientists have proposed a variety of theories to explain why kids with ASD tend to be less socially communicative than their TD peers. One popular theory, the social motivation hypothesis, suggests that kids with ASD aren't intrinsically motivated to interact with other people because they aren't neurologically "rewarded" by social interactions the same way TD kids are.


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https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-01-neural-children-autism-spectrum-disorder.html
Date
29th January 2018
Source
Medical Xpress