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Identifying early risk markers of self-injurious behaviour

Adolescent with autismProject Area: Examining the amount, forms and causes of self-injury in people on the autism spectrum

Research Team Caroline Richards, Prof. Chris Oliver and Dr. Debbie Allen

Institution: The Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders, The School of Psychology, University of Birmingham

Status: Completed

Length: 3 years

Method: 5 complementary studies examining the amount, forms and causes of self-injury in people on the autism spectrum

Likely impact:

This project provided

  • Research that identifies the amount, forms and causes of self-injury in people on the autism spectrum
  • Important information about the size of the problem and knowledge about how to intervene to reduce self-injury

Additional Information

Aims

This project had the following research aims:

  • To document the prevalence of self-injury in individuals with ASD
  • To contrast the prevalence and phenomenology of self-injury in ASD with people who have an intellectual disability and a genetic syndrome
  • To determine the behavioural correlates of self-injury in ASD in order to begin to define risk markers for the future development of self-injury
  • To establish the function of self-injury in a group of children with ASD
  • To explore the temporal relationships between self-injury and other behaviours

Studies

This project consisted of 5 complementary studies

  • Study 1: Self-injurious behaviour in autism spectrum disorder and to identify any associated behavioural and demographic characteristics in this more able population.
  • Study 2: Self-injurious behaviour in autism spectrum disorder: A three year follow up study
  • Study 3: Self-restraint in children and adults with autism spectrum disorder who self-injure
  • Study 4: The function of self-injurious behaviour in autism spectrum disorder
  • Study 5: The relationship between self-injury and other behaviours shown by children with autism spectrum disorder

Publications

Please see the Related Publications section below for details of the publications arising from this study.


Related Pages

Related Publications


Quick link:
http://researchautism.net/early-risk-markers-project
Updated
25 Oct 2017