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Identifying early risk markers of self-injurious behaviour

Adolescent with autismProject Area: Examining the amount, forms and causes of self-injury in people with autism

Research Team Caroline Richards, Prof. Chris Oliver and Dr. Debbie Allen

Institution: The Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders, The School of Psychology, University of Birmingham

Status: Completed

Length: 3 years

Method: 5 complementary studies examining the amount, forms and causes of self-injury in people with autism

Likely impact:

This project provided

  • Research that identifies the amount, forms and causes of self-injury in people with autism
  • Important information about the size of the problem and knowledge about how to intervene to reduce self-injury

Additional Information

Aims

This project had the following research aims:

  • To document the prevalence of self-injury in individuals with ASD
  • To contrast the prevalence and phenomenology of self-injury in ASD with people who have an intellectual disability and a genetic syndrome
  • To determine the behavioural correlates of self-injury in ASD in order to begin to define risk markers for the future development of self-injury
  • To establish the function of self-injury in a group of children with ASD
  • To explore the temporal relationships between self-injury and other behaviours

Studies

This project consisted of 5 complementary studies

  • Study 1: Self-injurious behaviour in autism spectrum disorder and to identify any associated behavioural and demographic characteristics in this more able population.
  • Study 2: Self-injurious behaviour in autism spectrum disorder: A three year follow up study
  • Study 3: Self-restraint in children and adults with autism spectrum disorder who self-injure
  • Study 4: The function of self-injurious behaviour in autism spectrum disorder
  • Study 5: The relationship between self-injury and other behaviours shown by children with autism spectrum disorder

Research Report

Research Report no. 6 Self injury in individuals with autism and learning disabilities

A team of researchers from the School of Psychology at the University of Birmingham conducted a survey of 288 parents and carers of people with autism and learning disabilities in order to find out more about self-injury.

The study aimed to examine: the amount of self-injury in people with autism compared to people with Fragile X and people with Down syndrome; the association between autistic characteristics and self-injury in each of these groups; and factors associated with self-injury in the group of people with autism.

Download report


Related Pages

Quick link:
http://researchautism.net/early-risk-markers-project
Updated
26 May 2015